« Diciembre 2005 | Inicio | Febrero 2006 »

Enero 31, 2006

Presentación de las Conclusiones del Análisis Prospectivo Delphi "Desarrollo y Sostenibilidad del Sistema Nacional de Salud Descentralizado" (8 de febrero de 2006, Barcelona)

Promovido por la Fundación Salud, Innovación y Sociedad y la Fundación Fernando Abril Martorell. Más información.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Eventos
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




The Rise of Hospitalists (Parte 1), Richard Vernick y Mitchell Wilson

If you're considering developing a hospitalist program, first map out your needs and your resources, then create a plan for introducing the idea.

The field of hospital medicine, the general medical care of hospitalized patients, continues to grow. The number of hospitalists working nationwide expanded from a few hundred in the mid-1990s to more than 8,000 in 2003. By the end of this decade, their number is expected to more than triple--to 25,000.

Hospitalists are not only growing in number; they are permeating hospital care. In Massachusetts, for example, only four out of 75 acute care hospitals had hospitalist programs in 1996. Today, 210 hospitalists coordinate care for 42 percent of 1.8 million inpatient days annually.

But perhaps the most significant issue concerning hospital medicine is not its rapid growth but the impact it's having on the way health care is delivered. The Center for Studying Health System Change--which recently published the results of a hospitalist market trend study, Health Care Market Trends and the Evolution of Hospitalist Use and Roles, in the February 2005 issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine--described it this way: "Hospitalists most commonly care for patients whose physicians prefer not to provide inpatient care or who lack admitting privileges.

However, hospitalists' clinical roles are expanding, for example, as they increasingly substitute for intensivists in ICUs, team with subspecialists to care for complicated patients, function as primary attending physicians in skilled nursing facilities and care for nursing home patients hospitalized at night."

As hospitals struggle with increasing financial pressures, a growing shortage of primary care physicians willing to cover the hospital, and problems with patient flow and safety issues, many are turning to hospitalist programs for solutions--often with great success.

If you're a CEO interested in starting a hospitalist program, consider the five issues below. They will help you determine what sort of program will best suit your organization, how it should be implemented and how your organization will pay for it.

What do you want out of a hospitalist program?
Generally speaking, two issues drive the development of most hospitalist programs: service and care management.

Some of the most common needs regarding service include:

* Managing admissions on behalf of the physicians, which improves their lifestyle and allows them to focus on outpatient volume.
* Providing prompt, attending physician services to patients without regular physicians and often without insurance or financial resources.
* Providing on-site, 24/7 physician coverage to hospitalized patients.

Some of the most common needs regarding care management include:

* Efficient use of resources, resulting in a decreased cost per case.
* Improved patient satisfaction due to increased physician presence.
* Improved quality of care due to the physician's increased familiarity with hospital procedures and processes.
* Improved compliance with order sets and standards of care.
* Improved throughput, better capacity management and decreased length of stay.
* Improved ED performance due to facilitated admission procedures.

What type of hospitalist program do you need?
There are at least four basic models or types of hospitalist programs. Each has its advantages and drawbacks, depending on your market and immediate needs. It is important to understand the pros and cons of each model before you begin--just as it is important to realize that hospitals often find themselves "mixing and matching" one or more types--especially when they're just getting started. The following information comes from a 2004 productivity and compensation survey by the Society of Hospital Medicine.

Hospitalist program by model/type and Percent of hospitalists employed by type:

* Hospital/hospital corporation
34%

* Single specialty/multispecialty group
16%

* Local hospitalist-only group
16%

* Multistate hospitalist-only group/hospitalist management company
9%

* Other (includes medical schools/academic programs, which may operate a mixed model)
25%

Research the pros and cons of each type of hospitalist program to determine which model best fits your needs. Talk with someone who knows hospital medicine from the inside out. You may choose a consultant who can introduce you to the topic, evaluate the level of your needs and make recommendations. Or you might contact hospitals with established hospitalist programs to gain insights into the development and growth process of the program, as well as the problems encountered, the costs and other factors.

How will you gain acceptance from your medical staff?
Acceptance by the physician community is critical--as is selling the concept to your medical staff. Depending on the market and type of hospitalist model you choose, the medical staff may perceive a hospitalist program as a competitive venture. Physicians are concerned about patient retention and satisfaction, as well as discontinuity of care.

Typically, when they're developing a new clinical service, hospital administrators will form a committee of doctors from the medical staff and start inviting vendors to make presentations. The act of bringing in vendors--such as a hospitalist management company or local hospitalist-only group--can raise all kinds of red flags among various interest groups if it's done too soon or not handled properly. You could wind up solidifying opposition to the program before it ever gets off the ground.

It's a good idea to find a physician who can champion your cause--someone who can be an advocate for implementing a hospital medicine service. This physician should be someone who has the communication ability, business savvy and clinical care legitimacy within the community, so he or she can also represent the conscience of the physicians.

How will you pay for this program?
Costs will vary, depending on the type of hospitalist model you choose, the payer mix and service requirements. On average, hospitalists will cost approximately $75,000 or more per FTE than the pro fee offset. A full-blown program with 24/7 coverage requires a staff of six hospitalists to stay within the benchmark numbers of shifts or hours per year.

If you're in a market where you want the hospitalist to provide unassigned and unfunded coverage, then the hospital must pay for the program based on other metrics or soft targets such as optimizing resource utilization, length of stay and so forth.

Hospitalist programs prove their worth by decreasing unnecessary consumption of hospital resources and increasing efficient handling of patients. Any savings that accrue from more efficient care, shorter length of stay, reduced use of resources and quicker disposition go directly to the bottom line.

Make or buy?
After defining your short- and long-term goals for the program, and determining the costs involved, you must decide whether you want to build your own program or buy one. Again, that decision depends on your needs and goals. If, for example, your hospital is drowning because you're at 100 percent capacity, your ED's on bypass all the time or you have a lot of unsponsored care, you may need to jump-start your program by contracting with a multistate hospitalist-only management group. On the other hand, you may decide to start off slowly with a call-based system of hospitalists that can evolve into a 24/7 program--either comprised of hospital-employed doctors or contracted with a local hospitalist-only group.

A New Way to Deliver Health Care
The numbers suggest that hospital medicine is here to stay. Whether you decide to have a hospitalist program or not, remember that as the field of hospital medicine grows, it will impact the way you and the doctors in your community do business. Hospitalists have been called "a new breed of physician"--fueling a debate over whether hospital medicine will eventually become a new specialty. No matter how that is resolved, hospitalists are clearly creating a new breed of health care delivery.

Fuente: This article 1st appeared on 2005-08-23 in Hospitals&Health Networks Magazine online site

Hospitals & Health Networks.gif

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Sincronizando talentos
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Enero 25, 2006

OneWorld Health

OneWorld Health es una empresa farmacéutica dedicada a hacer llegar medicinas a quien no puede permitírselas.

OneWorld Health.gif

Victoria Hale, investigadora científica de Genetech y antigua supervisora de solicitud de aprobación de nuevas medicinas en la Food and Drug Administration (FDA), conocía las barreras económicas y logísticas que impedían a las farmacéuticas desarrollar medicamentos para los países del Tercer Mundo. Para superarlas, fundó OneWorld Health, la primera compañía farmacéutica americana sin ánimo de lucro.

Victoria Hale, Institute for OneWorld Health.jpg


OneWorld Health es un modelo de negocio emprendedor concebido para permitir que las personas más necesitadas de países en vías de desarrollo accedan a las medicinas. Su estrategia consiste en rediseñar toda la cadena de valor.

Algunas ONG y gobiernos aportan gran parte de la financiación inicial. OneWorld Health, además, ha establecido un nuevo conjunto de asociaciones, que apuntan a crear valor para todas las partes implicadas.

Por una parte, las compañías de biotecnología encuentran una salida atractiva para la propiedad intelectual sin desarrollar. Por otra, los fines altruistas de su investigación y el empeño por fomentar el desarrollo atraen a científicos y voluntarios, que donan su tiempo, esfuerzo y conocimiento al proyecto.

La compañía se esfuerza al máximo por utilizar e integrar la capacidad científica y productora del mundo en desarrollo, para ser capaz de «aportar unas nuevas medicinas que sean apropiadas, efectivas y económicamente asequibles allí donde sean más necesarias».

Fuente: Revista de Antiguos Alumnos del IESE (número 94, julio – septiembre 2004)

Además, The Economist la ha reconocido como empresaria innovadora del año 2005 en la categoría de Social and Economic Innovation. Lo podeis leer aquí.

También Esquire Magazine la ha reconocido como ejecutiva del año. Más información.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Innovaciones sanitarias
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Enero 24, 2006

Medicina Basada en la Obediencia

La Medicina Basada en la Obediencia (no confundir con la Medicina Basada en la Evidencia) es una práctica defensiva de la medicina que se produce como consecuencia de la infragestión a la que sometemos a los talentos sanitarios.

Como resultado de que los altos mandos y los mandos intermedios infragestionan a los profesionales, éste se dedica a cumplir estrictamente con las “ordenanzas” de la jerarquía inmediatamente superior.

Ante este tipo de prácticas, no se produce ninguna “sincronización de talentos”, lo cual redunda en un mantenimiento del statu quo (que recuerdo que es una situación de equilibrio inestable y no sostenible en el medio-largo plazo).

En resumen, aquello de “préstame tu cerebro”. Compras mis horas, pero no mi talento. O más duro todavía: “tu me engañarás en el salario, pero a la hora de engañar en la cantidad y la calidad del trabajo, yo tengo la última palabra”.

change 2.jpg

La única forma de romper ese círculo vicioso es generar un círculo virtuoso en que se libere el talento de los profesionales. Y la llave de este cambio está en aquéllos que tienen la maravillosa responsabilidad de gestionar personas y equipos.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (2) | Categoría: ABC de la gestión sanitaria
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Características de los clínicos según diferentes estudios

Copio literalmente del Working Paper Nº 582 del IESE (Febrero, 2005), de Scott D. Eriksen (IE) e Ignacio Urrutia (IESE), titulado “An institucional Sociology Perspective of the Implementation of Activity Based Costing by Spanish Health Care Institutions”.

The relationship between physicians and hospital managers is highly conflict-laden, due mainly to the different socialization experiences and value sets of the two groups (Derber & Schwartz, 1991; Lurie, 1981).

Physicians are “dominant professionals” who control the core clinical processes (Friedson, 1975) and whose decisions commit up to 70-80% of hospital resources (Flood & Scott, 1978; Hillman et al., 1987), yet have essentially no responsibility for the economic consequences of their decisions (Young & Saltman, 1985; Weiner et al., 1987; Burns et al., 1993).

The inconsistencies between the institutional expectations shared by management and the internal clinical objectives of the physicians, combined with the scepticism of physicians regarding the legitimacy of the institutional objectives, suggest the high probability that physicians will adopt a strategic response of non-compliance. This probability is augmented by the general absence of managerial training and education among physicians.

El Working Paper en sí trata el tema del Activity Based Costing, o el coste basado en actividades, pero a mí me ha servido para localizar buena bibliografía que demuestra porque los clínicos pueden actuar como una barrera que prevenga la introducción de cualquier tipo de iniciativa en una organización sanitaria.

Sobre todo, porque algunas veces, en algunos foros, me he visto involucrado en disputas intelectuales, en donde se me ha dicho que “esas historias eran invenciones”…

Aquí os dejo el documento, para que podáis echarle una ojeada por vosotros mismos.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Sincronizando talentos
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Enero 23, 2006

Aravind Eye Hospital (India): qué podemos aprender

Este artículo “The Perfect Vision Dr. V”, me lo encontré en Fast Company, una maravilla de revista.

Trata de cómo el liderazgo puede aparecer en cualquier lugar de la tierra. “At the Aravind Eye Hospital in Madurai, India, 82-year-old Dr. Govindappa Venkataswamy has solved the mistery of leadership: He brings eyesight to the blind and light to the soul”.

Aquí os dejo el enlace al texto.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Innovaciones sanitarias
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Enero 19, 2006

Saving Accounts, Institute for Healthcare Improvement

El documento al que me voy a referir en este post, es uno de los que más me gustan del último par de años.

Simplemente me encanta. Ojala pudiera escribirse uno sobre el sistema sanitario europeo o incluso español.

Se trata de Saving Accounts, el Progress Report del año 2006 del Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI).

El documento recoge 32 historias de transformaciones de organizaciones sanitarias que han tenido un impacto directo en salvar vidas.

Para generar la necesidad de tener que leerlo, os dejo con algunas perlas de la introducción. Las he encontrado profundamente motivantes. Desgraciadamente, creo que a este lado del Atlántico todavía no estamos en ese estadio de desarrollo.

Ahí van...:

This is a remarkable time for those of us intent on improving health care. Never before has there been such a groundswell of excitement and commitment for effective change, or so many health care leaders ready to find alternatives to the status quo.

More than half of the hospitals in the United States have joined IHI’s 100,000 Lives Campaign. Never before have we seen such unity in our industry around a shared purpose, the common cause of avoiding preventable deaths.

Health care improvement is about moving one step at a time toward the “No Needless” vision. It’s about making the small and
large changes that save time, resources, energy…and ultimately patients’ lives.

So, we present these stories of saving: Stories of brave institutions that have found the status quo unacceptable and have committed to a new level of performance, and stories of some of the patients whose lives have been affected by these changes.

Acceso directo al IHI 2006 Progress Report.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Cambiando las conversaciones
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Más sobre el modelo Alzira

Para completar el anterior post, también es bueno leer lo que piensan los que sostienen ideas contrarias a las tuyas.

Navegando por la web, fruto de la serindipia, me encontrado con el siguiente blog:

Hospital de la Ribera de Alzira, La Vergüenza.

No parece que esté muy actualizado. De hecho, todos los comentarios que tiene se produjeron en marzo de 2005.

Ciertamente extraño...

Insisto: es bueno conocer todos los puntos de vista.

Ahora también: dos cosas no pueden ser verdad a la vez.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Innovaciones sanitarias
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Modelo Alzira

Leo en Diario Médico (13 de enero de 2006):

Alzira cierra 2005 con 1,8 millones de euros de beneficio y prevé llegar a 3,6 en 2006.

Es decir, que la inversión inicial ya ha alcanzado el equilibrio económico-asistencial.

Imagino que a algunos les entrará la tendencia a la misma crítica de siempre: baja calidad, menor actividad, etc.

Pues los datos indican otra cosa, así que, por ahora, y hasta que se demuestre lo contrario, hemos de concluir que el modelo valenciano (como le gusta decir al conseller Rambla), tiene sus puntos positivos, que parece que van ganando a los negativos.

Los indicadores asistenciales señalan que:
• la actividad se ha incrementado (de 19.279 hospitalizaciones a 20.193; de 19.606 a 20.026 intervenciones quirúrgicas, y de 2.499 partos a 2.581)
• se ha reducido la estancia media (de 4,77 días a 4,71);
• la demora media quirúrgica es de 41 días;
• no hay ningún paciente que espere más de 90 días para ser intervenido.

Creo que es un buen momento para echarle una buena ojeada al modelo, para comprenderlo antes de criticarlo.

Un muy buen artículo es:
Tarazona Ginés, E; Torner de Rosa, A; Ferrer Marín M. La experiencia del modelo Alzira del Hospital de la Ribera a la Ribera-área 10 de salud: la consolidación del modelo. Revista de Administración Sanitaria. 2005; 3 (1): 83-98.

Aquí os dejo el link.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Cambiando las conversaciones
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




31 diseñadores crean la "bata de sus sueños"

Prestigiosos diseñadores españoles han creado una colección de "batas de sus sueños" con los que se ayudarán a los niños hospitalizados.

Los fondos recaudados por la compra de la colección irán destinados íntegramente a sufragar la actividad de la Fundación Theodora en 2006, para proseguir así con la labor de los 15 Doctores Sonrisa en los once hospitales.

theodora.gif

La Fundación Theodora ha pedido a 31 diseñadores españoles que se conviertan por un instante en niños y dejen fluir su imaginación y creatividad para diseñar 'la bata de sus sueños', la que ayude a los niños hospitalizados a escapar de la realidad en la que viven en los centros sanitarios.

El resultado es una colección irrepetible que une el diseño español más actual con el mundo mágico de los Doctores Sonrisa, artistas profesionales que visitan a los menores hospitalizados como parte de las iniciativas de la fundación para "aliviar su sufrimiento a través de la risa".
Bata de sus sueños, diseñadores.jpg

Agatha Ruiz de la Prada, Lorenzo Caprile, Elio Berhanyer, Jesús del Pozo, Francis Montesinos, Amaya Arzuaga y Roberto Torreta (de izqda. a dcha.), junto a otros 24 diseñadores son los creadores de la colección, expuesta desde mediados de diciembre en el Museo del Traje (Madrid). La recaudación se destinará a sufragar las visitas de los Doctores Sonrisa.

Aquí os dejo un PDF con los diseños...

Vía websalud.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Innovaciones sanitarias
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Una de mis historias médicas preferidas...

Vale que toca innovar, pero también toca que la masa social acepte nuestras innovaciones…

Una de las historias que más me gusta del mundo de la medicina es ésta:

"The Hungarian surgeon Ignaz Semmelweiss in 1847 reduced the death rate in his hospital from twelve to two percent, simply by washing hands between operations -- a concept that today would be advocated by a four year old child.

When Semmelweiss urged his colleagues to introduce hygiene to the operating rooms, they had him committed to a mental hospital where he eventually died".

No toca solo hablar de “innovar”, sino de vencer las resistencias en las organizaciones. Y creo que, a veces, es lo más difícil. Seguro que Ignaz estaría de acuerdo conmigo.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Innovaciones sanitarias
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Enero 18, 2006

Evelina Children's Hospital: un hospital de niños, diseñado por niños

Me pasa mi padre (nada como la familia para llegar donde no llega uno...) un CD con información sobre el Evelina Children's Hospital (140 camas), perteneciente al Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust.

Guy's and St Thomas.gif

Lo primero a decir, es que se lo ha pasado la hija de una amiga de la familia, que estudió una carrera de ciencias de la salud en España, y que está trabajando en un hospital inglés.

Es decir, otro caso de expulsión de cerebros (creo que referirse a este fenómeno como fuga de cerebros puede resultar peyorativo para estos profesionales, que no se fugan, sino que los expulsa el sistema).

Una vez aclarado esto, paso a comentar esta innovación sanitaria. De las que más me ha gustado, junto con las de los payasos, la música y la magia.

Empecemos por el principio: el Evelina Children's Hospital es el primer hospital de niños construido en Londres en los últimos 100 años. Y sólo puedo decir, que me parece que han sido conscientes de este hecho, y lo han montado bien.

Evelina Children's Hospital.jpg

Del CD, que incluye un video de 15 minutos, lo que más me ha gustado es la idea de que han sido los niños quienes han "hecho" el hospital por dentro.

Los 3 features que más me gustan son:

1. Los nombres de los pisos son elementos del mundo natural (bosque, sabana, artico,...), yendo desde el mar (nivel 0) al cielo (nivel 6).

Evelina symbols.gif

Evelina por pisos.jpg

2. Las plantas de hospitalización están en los pisos superiores del edificio de 7 plantas, para que sus pacientes disfruten de las mejores vistas (a Lambeth Palace y al Archbishop’s Park).

evelina 1.jpg

3. El conservatorio, el escenario y el colegio son el eje de la actividad en el hospital. Aquí os dejo una foto de la fiesta de Halloween que tuvo lugar en el Evelina.

Evelina Halloween Party.jpg

Los comentarios de Sir Jonathan Michael, CEO, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, son muy reveladores:

We wanted the new Evelina Children’s Hospital to be much more than a landmark building on a landmark site. Our aim has been to create a hospital that does not feel like a hospital by involving children, their families and our staff in every stage of the design process.

The result is truly inspirational. The new Evelina is a supremely practical, state-of-the-art hospital, but one that is full of imagination, warmth and fun. It redefines the concept of a children’s hospital and will undoubtedly influence the building of new hospitals in Britain and across the world”.

Aquí os dejo el link para que podais echarle una ojeada por vosotros mismos. Y un resumen para la prensa que recoge las ideas más importantes.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Innovaciones sanitarias
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Websalud

Websalud es un portal informativo gratuito especializado en las áreas de salud, farmacia y sanidad.

Merecen la pena los artículos de opinión, publicados por expertos de reconocido prestigio dentro del sector.

websalud 2.jpg


Un vistazo semanal puede aportaros noticias y puntos de vista interesantes.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: www
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Enero 17, 2006

Los sistemas de información para transformar nuestras dinámicas decisionales

Los sistemas de información de las organizaciones sanitarias tienen una finalidad exclusivamente estadística, porque sólo los utilizamos para hacer las memorias, y están muy poco orientados a la toma de decisiones de la gestión diaria, tanto la clínica como la económica.

Para transformar nuestros sistemas de información en algo útil, es imprescindible usar los datos para tomar decisiones: tener datos on-time tiene que transformar nuestras dinámicas decisionales.

Para ello hay que “enriquecer” los datos. Es decir, hay que cruzar los datos entre sí. Y pasar tiempo con ellos, trabajándolos, depurándolos, discutiéndolos. Hay que dejar que nos hablen...

Sé que está difícil, pero mientras escribía este post me estaba acordando del pobre Lou Gerstner…

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Sincronizando talentos
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Miguel Cabrer, CIO del Hospital Son Llàtzer

Otro de nuestros innovadores sanitarios. Gente que está transformando las organizaciones desde dentro: Miguel Cabrer, CIO del Hospital Son Llàtzer.

Miguel Cabrer.jpg

Podría hablar un ratito de él, pero creo que es mejor que hablen otros.

Os copio directamente uno de los endorsements que han hecho a su trabajo, en LinkedIn

Miquel knows medical systems better than anyone I have every worked with. Great person to work with and would recommend him to anyone in need of Hospital integration work”.
(November 15, 2005)

Dave Huddleston
CIO at Pak/TEEM Inc. and Owner, IKC Consulting

Seguiremos atentos a su trabajo… Y no sólo desde aquí…

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Talento inquieto
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Experiencias sanitarias en la puerta de un gran hospital

Vengo de uno de los grandes hospitales de este país, a donde me he acercado para tratar temas de procesos. Y justo cuando me he bajado del taxi ha pasado una cosa muy interesante.

Resulta que había alguien de una empresa de paquetería que tenía que entregar un envío a alguien del hospital, y no estaba claro dónde debía realizar la entrega. Se había acercado al bedel para pedirle algún tipo de indicación. La respuesta del bedel no tiene desperdicio:

Ni idea. Oiga, yo estoy en la puerta. No lo puedo saber todo”.

Y el de Seur se quedo con el paquete en la mano.

Ostia, saberlo todo no, pero averiguarlo sí, ¿NO?

Los consultores tienden a denominar a este tipo de organizaciones como “de baja orientación cliente”.

En cualquier otra organización, lo cogen. Aunque sea una bomba…

Insisto en que tenemos “tics” de empresas del siglo XIX en medio del siglo XXI.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Cambiando las conversaciones
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Enero 13, 2006

Hospital Universitario Karolinska pone a La Fe de Valencia como modelo de gestión sanitaria "eficiente"

Leo en Europa Press la siguiente noticia:

El Hospital Universitario La Fe de Valencia ha sido seleccionado por el prestigioso Hospital Universitario Karolinska (Suecia) como uno de los cinco centros sanitarios internacionales que mejor pueden servir de referencia a la hora de construir un nuevo edificio y establecer modelos de gestión sanitaria eficientes, según informaron hoy fuentes de este centro hospitalario.

En este sentido, una delegación de siete expertos procedentes del hospital sueco visitó hoy la ciudad sanitaria para conocer e intercambiar experiencias sobre las nuevas formas de gestión sanitaria y la construcción del nuevo centro sanitario situado en el barrio de Malilla.

Del mismo modo, la visita contó con la presentación de diferentes ponencias basadas en los nuevos modelos de gestión clínica, la docencia y la investigación, la distribución arquitectónica del nuevo edificio y los cuidados enfermeros, entre otras cuestiones.

Tras estas ponencias, la comisión de expertos observaron las obras del nuevo Hospital La Fe para conocer el proyecto arquitectónico y cómo se han integrado las últimas tecnologías en el diseño del edificio "con el objetivo de ofrecer la mayor calidad asistencial y comodidad a los pacientes así como el mejor entorno de trabajo posible para los profesionales", apuntaron las mismas fuentes.

Una vez finalizada la visita, la comisión sueca viajará a Londres, Canadá y Estados Unidos para visitar otros cuatro centros sanitarios que también se encuentran en proceso de construcción de un nuevo edificio asistencial.

Siempre es bueno ser referencia positiva...

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Innovaciones sanitarias
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Enero 12, 2006

Infragestión

Es la incapacidad de un directivo para hacerse responsable y alumbrar el camino de su organización, y decirle a la gente lo que hay que hacer.

Esta incapacidad genera una sensación de desorientación y enfado entre los profesionales que componen la organización (que son en definitiva los que hacen que las cosas pasen).

Debo este concepto a Julio Mayol, desde su blog Panorama desde el puente.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: ABC de la gestión sanitaria
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Enero 10, 2006

El objetivo de la Gestión Clínica

El objetivo de la Gestión Clínica es lograr un mayor compromiso del profesional en la toma de decisiones, no sólo clínicas, sino también de distribución de recursos.

Es decir, que el médico comparta riesgos, tanto en la micro como en la mesogestión.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (4) | Categoría: Sincronizando talentos
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Enero 07, 2006

Disease Management (25 de enero de 2006, Madrid)

Seminario intensivo organizado Pharmaceutical Training Institute (PTI) sobre cómo mejorar sus procesos sanitarios aplicando el Disease Management. Más información aquí.

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Eventos
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Enero 06, 2006

Michael Rawins, NICE

Para comenzar el año (espero que se cumplen todos vuestros sueños y que sea insuperable hasta la llegada de 2007), os dejo con las reflexiones de Michael Rawlins el director del National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) que hizo en la conferencia de Madrid de noviembre de 2005.

Michael Rawlins, NICE.jpg

"Mi ideal es que el enfermo llegue a la consulta con la guía de práctica clínica del NICE en la mano y pregunte por qué no le están atendiendo de acuerdo con el protocolo".

"Algunas empresas farmacéuticas financian a grupos de pacientes para que ejerzan presión sobre nosotros. A eso yo lo llamo alianzas impías".

"Nos hemos podido equivocar, pero todo lo que hacemos está colgado en nuestra página web y es absolutamente transparente".

"Las organizaciones de pacientes son, normalmente, bastante agradables, pero si les dices que no se vuelven hostiles. Para desactivar los piquetes suelo invitarles a té con pastas, sacarles de delante de las cámaras y explicarles cómo tomamos las terribles decisiones que nos toca tomar y suelen entender nuestra posición".

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Sincronizando talentos
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati




Enero 02, 2006

Consejo para mejorar nuestras organizaciones

He leido en Algo que hacer este proverbio holandés que me ha encantado y que os quiero dejar como reflexión a todos aquellos que luchan contra viento y marea por mejorar nuestras organizaciones.

"No puede impedirse el viento. Pero pueden construirse molinos".

Creo que es una buena filosofía, de vida y de trabajo, para el año que apenas ha comenzado...

Jorge Fernández | Comentarios (0) | Categoría: Tip of the week
Envía este post a Menéame | Envía este post a Del.icio.us | Envía este post a Digg | Envía este post a Technorati